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Stringer, Appelbaum, Durso meet with Local 338 grocery store workers, highlight plans to support essential workers after COVID

Stringer, Appelbaum tour supermarket, hear from Local 338 essential workers about supports they need moving forward from the pandemic

Stringer: “I’ve been fighting for essential workers since long before we called them essential workers, and I know the fight doesn’t end with the end of the pandemic… As mayor, I will deliver an equitable recovery to make New York City stronger and fairer after COVID than ever before.”

New York, NY – Comptroller Scott Stringer today joined RWDSU President Stuart Appelbaum, Local 338 RWDSU/UFCW President John Durso, and Local 338 grocery store workers to discuss the challenges of being essential workers through the pandemic and highlight Stringer’s plans to continue supporting them in a post-COVID recovery.

Footage of the supermarket tour is available at this link. Video from the press conference is available at this link.

Comptroller Scott Stringer said: “We must focus on vaccinating New Yorkers and ending our public health crisis, but we will still have a long way to go to make New York work for essential workers — the city was unaffordable for working people before COVID, and it will be after COVID as well. I’ve been fighting for essential workers since long before we called them essential workers, and I know the fight doesn’t end with the end of the pandemic — we can’t just reopen the economy the same way we closed it. I have the bold progressive vision and the necessary skills and experience to lead the greatest city in the world out of its greatest crisis. As mayor, I will deliver an equitable recovery to make New York City stronger and fairer after COVID than ever before.”

Stuart Appelbaum, President of RWDSU, said: “This mayoral election is the most important race for mayor in a generation, and Scott Stringer is the right person at the right time for this job. With the city facing not only a public health crisis but also an economic crisis and a racial justice crisis, there is nobody better prepared to lead our city forward than Scott. The road to making this a city foshoudkl r everyone was never going to be easy, but he is not new to this union, this city, or this fight — he has a record of progressive achievements that is unmatched in this field and we need somebody who will be ready on day one, armed with New York’s progressive values, to fight for us. To the working people of this city: Scott Stringer has always stood up for us, and we should have no doubt that as mayor he will do exactly the same.”

John R. Durso, President of Local 338 RWDSU/UFCW, said: “Local 338 members have been the unsung heroes of this pandemic. They have gone to work every day and taken care of their neighbors, making sure that the rest of us have food to put on the table for our families. New York City needs a mayor who truly understands that working people are the backbone of our communities, and I know that person is Scott Stringer. Scott has stood with our members time and time again to demand better pay, fight for better working conditions, and demonstrate exactly the kind of leadership we deserve from our elected officials. As mayor, Scott will deliver for working people like they’ve delivered for this city, and we’ll be with him all the way to City Hall.”

Stringer was endorsed yesterday by District Council 9 Painters and Allied Trades. RWDSU endorsed Stringer in October 2020.

See tour footage HERE and press conference video HERE.

Scott Stringer was born and raised in Washington Heights. He attended P.S. 152 on Nagle Avenue and I.S. 52 on Academy Street. He graduated from John F. Kennedy High School in Marble Hill and John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Manhattan, a CUNY school.

Stringer was elected City Comptroller in 2013. Prior to serving as Comptroller, he was Manhattan Borough President from 2006 to 2013 and represented the Upper West Side in the New York State Assembly from 1992 to 2005. He and his wife, Elyse Buxbaum, live in Manhattan with their two children, Max and Miles.

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